What did they do? Deriving high-level edit histories in wikis

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What did they do? Deriving high-level edit histories in wikis
Authors: Peter Kin-Fong Fong, Robert P. Biuk-Aghai [edit item]
Citation: Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration (WikiSym '10)  : . 2010 July 7-9. Gdansk, Poland. ACM.
Publication type: Conference paper
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s):
DOI: 10.1145/1832772.1832775.
Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: No
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What did they do? Deriving high-level edit histories in wikis is a publication by Peter Kin-Fong Fong, Robert P. Biuk-Aghai.


[edit] Abstract

Wikis have become a popular online collaboration platform. Their open nature can, and indeed does, lead to a large number of editors of their articles, who create a large number of revisions. These editors make various types of edits on an article, from minor ones such as spelling correction and text formatting, to major revisions such as new content introduction, whole article re-structuring, etc. Given the enormous number of revisions, it is difficult to identify the type of contributions made in these revisions through human observation alone. Moreover, different types of edits imply different edit significance. A revision that introduces new content is arguably more significant than a revision making a few spelling corrections. By taking edit types into account, better measurements of edit significance can be produced. This paper proposes a method for categorizing and presenting edits in an intuitive way and with a flexible measure of significance of each individual editor's contributions.

[edit] Research questions

Research details

Topics: Missing topics [edit item]
Domains: Missing domains [edit item]
Theory type: Missing theory_type [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: [edit item]
Theories: [edit item]
Research design: [edit item]
Data source: [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Missing unit_of_analysis [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: Missing wikipedia_data_extraction [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: Missing wikipedia_page_type [edit item]
Wikipedia language: Missing wikipedia_language [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

[edit] Comments

[edit] References

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[2] B. Thomas Adler , Luca de Alfaro , Ian Pye , Vishwanath Raman, Measuring author contributions to the Wikipedia, Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Wikis, September 08-10, 2008, Porto, Portugal [doi>10.1145/1822258.1822279]

[3] Burns, R. and Long, D. 1997. A linear time, constant space differencing algorithm. In Proceedings of the Performance, Computing, and Communication Conference (Phoenix, Arizona, USA, Feb. 5--7, 1997). IEEE, 429--436.

[4] Xavier de Pedro Puente, New method using Wikis and forums to evaluate individual contributions in cooperative work while promoting experiential learning:: results from preliminary experience, Proceedings of the 2007 international symposium on Wikis, p.87-92, October 21-25, 2007, Montreal, Quebec, Canada [doi>10.1145/1296951.1296961]

[5] Anja Ebersbach , Markus Glaser , Richard Heigl , Alexander Warta, Wiki: Web Collaboration, Springer Publishing Company, Incorporated, 2008

[6] Michael D. Ekstrand , John T. Riedl, rv you're dumb: identifying discarded work in Wiki article history, Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration, October 25-27, 2009, Orlando, Florida [doi>10.1145/1641309.1641317]

[7] Arnaud Gorgeon , E. Burton Swanson, Organizing the vision for web 2.0: a study of the evolution of the concept in Wikipedia, Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration, October 25-27, 2009, Orlando, Florida [doi>10.1145/1641309.1641337]

[8] Hunt, J. W. and McIlroy, M. D. 1976. An Algorithm for Differential File Comparison. Computing Science Technical Report, Bell Laboratories 41.

[9] Kittur, A., Chi, E., Pendleton, B. A., Suh, B. and Mytkowicz, T. 2007. Power of the few vs. wisdom of the crowd: Wikipedia and the rise of the bourgeoisie. Alt. CHI, 2007, San Jose, CA.

[10] Leuf, B. and Cunningham, W. 2001. The Wiki Way: Collaboration and Sharing on the Internet. Addison-Wesley Professional.

[11] Levenshtein, V. I. 1966. Binary codes capable of correcting deletions, insertions, and reversals. Soviet Physics Doklady 10, 707--710.

[12] Myers, E. 1986. An O(ND) Difference Algorithm and Its Variations. Algorithmica, 1(2): 251--266.

[13] Christine M. Neuwirth , Ravinder Chandhok , David S. Kaufer , Paul Erion , James Morris , Dale Miller, Flexible Diff-ing in a collaborative writing system, Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work, p.147-154, November 01-04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada [doi>10.1145/143457.143473]

[14] David D. Palmer , Marti A. Hearst, Adaptive multilingual sentence boundary disambiguation, Computational Linguistics, v.23 n.2, p.241-267, June 1997

[15] Mikalai Sabel, Structuring wiki revision history, Proceedings of the 2007 international symposium on Wikis, p.125-130, October 21-25, 2007, Montreal, Quebec, Canada [doi>10.1145/1296951.1296965]

[16] Libby Veng-Sam Tang , Robert P. Biuk-Aghai , Simon Fong, A method for measuring co-authorship relationships in MediaWiki, Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Wikis, September 08-10, 2008, Porto, Portugal [doi>10.1145/1822258.1822280]

[17] Walter F. Tichy, The string-to-string correction problem with block moves, ACM Transactions on Computer Systems (TOCS), v.2 n.4, p.309-321, Nov. 1984 [doi>10.1145/357401.357404]

[18] Fernanda B. Viégas , Martin Wattenberg , Kushal Dave, Studying cooperation and conflict between authors with history flow visualizations, Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems, p.575-582, April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria [doi>10.1145/985692.985765]

Further notes[edit]

Facts about "What did they do? Deriving high-level edit histories in wikis"RDF feed
AbstractWikis have become a popular online collaboWikis have become a popular online collaboration platform. Their open nature can, and indeed does, lead to a large number of editors of their articles, who create a large number of revisions. These editors make various types of edits on an article, from minor ones such as spelling correction and text formatting, to major revisions such as new content introduction, whole article re-structuring, etc. Given the enormous number of revisions, it is difficult to identify the type of contributions made in these revisions through human observation alone. Moreover, different types of edits imply different edit significance. A revision that introduces new content is arguably more significant than a revision making a few spelling corrections. By taking edit types into account, better measurements of edit significance can be produced. This paper proposes a method for categorizing and presenting edits in an intuitive way and with a flexible measure of significance of each individual editor's contributions.of each individual editor's contributions.
Added by wikilit teamNo +
Conference locationGdansk, Poland +
Dates7-9 +
Doi10.1145/1832772.1832775 +
Google scholar urlhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22What%2Bdid%2Bthey%2Bdo%3F%2BDeriving%2Bhigh-level%2Bedit%2Bhistories%2Bin%2Bwikis%22 +
Has authorPeter Kin-Fong Fong + and Robert P. Biuk-Aghai +
MonthJuly +
Peer reviewedYes +
Publication typeConference paper +
Published inProceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration (WikiSym '10) +
PublisherACM +
Revid10,590 +
TitleWhat did they do? Deriving high-level edit histories in wikis
Urlhttp://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1832772.1832775 +
Year2010 +