Visualizing co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge

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Visualizing co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge
Authors: Joachim Kimmerle, Johannes Moskaliuk, Andreas Harrer, Ulrike Cress [edit item]
Citation: Information, Communication & Society  : . 2010.
Publication type: Journal article
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s):
DOI: 10.1080/13691180903521547.
Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Added on initial load
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Visualizing co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge is a publication by Joachim Kimmerle, Johannes Moskaliuk, Andreas Harrer, Ulrike Cress.


[edit] Abstract

This paper describes how processes of knowledge building with wikis may be visualized, citing the user-generated online encyclopedia Wikipedia as an example. The underlying theoretical basis is a framework for collaborative knowledge building with wikis that describes knowledge building as a co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge. These co-evolutionary processes may be visualized graphically, applying methods from social network analysis, especially those methods that take dynamic changes into account. For this purpose, we have undertaken to analyse, on the one hand, the temporal development of a Wikipedia article and related articles that are linked to this core article. On the other hand, we analysed the temporal development of those users who worked on these articles. The resulting graphics show an analogous process, both with regard to the articles that refer to the core article and to the users involved. These results provide empirical support for the co-evolution model.

[edit] Research questions

"This paper describes how processes of knowledge building with wikis may be visualized, citing the user-generated online encyclopedia Wikipedia as an example."

Research details

Topics: Other content topics [edit item]
Domains: Computer science, Information science, Sociology [edit item]
Theory type: Design and action [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Case [edit item]
Theories: "The approach of these authors is based on Luhmann's (1995, 2006) systems theory, and accordingly, they regard knowledge building as an interplay between cognitive systems and a social system (cf. also Moskaliuk et al. 2008).

co-evolution theory

According to the model of co-evolution, we were able to formulate two main hypotheses. The first hypothesis concerns the social system wiki. We assumed that the wiki becomes more and more complex over time, which means an increasing number of pages and links between the wiki pages (as a form of external assimilation). In addition, we assumed that pages that belong to the same explanatory model of the causes of schizophrenia (biological or social) were grouped into a cluster at an early stage of the wiki, which means that there are more links between pages within a cluster than between clusters. These clusters are supposed to merge over time, which would indicate integration or combination of the two models (diathesis–stress model). This could then be interpreted as external accommodation. The second hypothesis concerned the cognitive systems of the authors. Our assumption was that an author who writes a contribution for a wiki page that supports a certain explanatory model (biological, social, psychoanalytical, or diathesis–stress model) will usually belong to a ‘community of interest’ in that model. Participation of specific authors in such a community will change over time, indicating some development of these authors and their cognitive systems, as a result of a socio-cognitive conflict between their individual knowledge on the one hand and the information contained in the wiki on the other." [edit item]

Research design: Experiment [edit item]
Data source: Experiment responses, Wikipedia pages [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: Longitudinal [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Article, User [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: Dump [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: Article, History [edit item]
Wikipedia language: German [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"The progress of the wiki articles and the development of the authors are the two components of the co-evolution process. The parallel development of the wiki and its authors indicates a co-evolution of the social system and the individuals' cognitive systems. So what has occurred here is obviously a situation in which authors take up information from the wiki and integrate new aspects into their individual cognitive systems. And this, in turn, changes the social system wiki, and so on. This supports the co-evolution theory, particularly as a closer look reveals that there is an obvious tendency towards the integrative diathesis–stress model (triangles in Figure 6). At the same time, those authors who contributed to integrative articles did not shift back to one of the narrower (biological or social) perspectives; once they have decided to belong to the integrative community, they seem to stick to it."

[edit] Comments

"The resulting graphics show an analogous process, both with regard to the articles that refer to the core article and to the users involved. These results provide empirical support for the co-evolution model."


Further notes[edit]

Facts about "Visualizing co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge"RDF feed
AbstractThis paper describes how processes of knowThis paper describes how processes of knowledge building with wikis may be visualized, citing the user-generated online encyclopedia Wikipedia as an example. The underlying theoretical basis is a framework for collaborative knowledge building with wikis that describes knowledge building as a co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge. These co-evolutionary processes may be visualized graphically, applying methods from social network analysis, especially those methods that take dynamic changes into account. For this purpose, we have undertaken to analyse, on the one hand, the temporal development of a Wikipedia article and related articles that are linked to this core article. On the other hand, we analysed the temporal development of those users who worked on these articles. The resulting graphics show an analogous process, both with regard to the articles that refer to the core article and to the users involved. These results provide empirical support for the co-evolution model.irical support for the co-evolution model.
Added by wikilit teamAdded on initial load +
Collected data time dimensionLongitudinal +
CommentsThe resulting graphics show an analogous process, both with regard to the articles that refer to the core article and to the users involved. These results provide empirical support for the co-evolution model.
ConclusionThe progress of the wiki articles and the The progress of the wiki articles and the development of the authors are the two components of the co-evolution process. The parallel development of the wiki and its authors indicates a co-evolution of the social system and the individuals' cognitive systems. So what has occurred here is obviously a situation in which authors take up information from the wiki and integrate new aspects into their individual cognitive systems. And this, in turn, changes the social system wiki, and so on. This supports the co-evolution theory, particularly as a closer look reveals that there is an obvious tendency towards the integrative diathesis–stress model (triangles in Figure 6). At the same time, those authors who contributed to integrative articles did not shift back to one of the narrower (biological or social) perspectives; once they have decided to belong to the integrative community, they seem to stick to it.ative community, they seem to stick to it.
Data sourceExperiment responses + and Wikipedia pages +
Doi10.1080/13691180903521547 +
Google scholar urlhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22Visualizing%2Bco-evolution%2Bof%2Bindividual%2Band%2Bcollective%2Bknowledge%22 +
Has authorJoachim Kimmerle +, Johannes Moskaliuk +, Andreas Harrer + and Ulrike Cress +
Has domainComputer science +, Information science + and Sociology +
Has topicOther content topics +
Peer reviewedYes +
Publication typeJournal article +
Published inInformation, Communication & Society +
Research designExperiment +
Research questionsThis paper describes how processes of knowledge building with wikis may be visualized, citing the user-generated online encyclopedia Wikipedia as an example.
Revid11,033 +
TheoriesThe approach of these authors is based on The approach of these authors is based on Luhmann's (1995, 2006) systems theory, and accordingly, they regard knowledge building as an interplay between cognitive systems and a social system (cf. also Moskaliuk et al. 2008).

co-evolution theory

According to the model of co-evolution, we were able to formulate two main hypotheses. The first hypothesis concerns the social system wiki. We assumed that the wiki becomes more and more complex over time, which means an increasing number of pages and links between the wiki pages (as a form of external assimilation). In addition, we assumed that pages that belong to the same explanatory model of the causes of schizophrenia (biological or social) were grouped into a cluster at an early stage of the wiki, which means that there are more links between pages within a cluster than between clusters. These clusters are supposed to merge over time, which would indicate integration or combination of the two models (diathesis–stress model). This could then be interpreted as external accommodation.

The second hypothesis concerned the cognitive systems of the authors. Our assumption was that an author who writes a contribution for a wiki page that supports a certain explanatory model (biological, social, psychoanalytical, or diathesis–stress model) will usually belong to a ‘community of interest’ in that model. Participation of specific authors in such a community will change over time, indicating some development of these authors and their cognitive systems, as a result of a socio-cognitive conflict between their individual knowledge on the one hand and the information contained in the wiki on the other.
mation contained in the wiki on the other.
Theory typeDesign and action +
TitleVisualizing co-evolution of individual and collective knowledge
Unit of analysisArticle + and User +
Urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/13691180903521547 +
Wikipedia coverageCase +
Wikipedia data extractionDump +
Wikipedia languageGerman +
Wikipedia page typeArticle + and History +
Year2010 +