The shoemaker's children: using wikis for information systems teaching, research, and publication

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The shoemaker's children: using wikis for information systems teaching, research, and publication
Authors: Gerald C. Kane, Robert G. Fichman [edit item]
Citation: MIS Quarterly 33 (1): . 2009.
Publication type: Journal article
Peer-reviewed: Yes
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Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Added on initial load
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The shoemaker's children: using wikis for information systems teaching, research, and publication is a publication by Gerald C. Kane, Robert G. Fichman.


[edit] Abstract

This paper argues that Web 2.0 tools, specifically wikis, have begun to influence business and knowledge sharing practices in many organizations. Information Systems researchers have spent considerable time exploring the impact and implications of these tools in organizations, but those same researchers have not spent sufficient time considering whether and how these new technologies may provide opportunities for us to reform our core practices of research, review, and teaching. To this end, this paper calls for the {IS} discipline to engage in two actions related to wikis and other Web 2.0 tools. First, the {IS} discipline ought to engage in critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently. Our existing practices were formulated during an era of paperbased exchange; wikis and other Web 2.0 tools may enable processes that could be substantively better. Nevertheless, users can appropriate information technology tools in unexpected ways, and even when tools are appropriated as expected there can be unintended negative consequences. Any potential changes to our core processes should, therefore, be considered critically and carefully, leading to our second recommended action. We advocate and describe a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them. We argue that these experiments can provide needed information regarding Web 2.0 tools and related practice changes that could help the discipline better assess whether or not new practices would be superior to existing ones and under which circumstances.

[edit] Research questions

"Information Systems researchers have spent considerable time exploring the impact and implications of these tools in organizations, but those same researchers have not spent sufficient time considering whether and how these new technologies may provide opportunities for us to reform our core practices of research, review, and teaching."

Research details

Topics: Research platform [edit item]
Domains: Information systems [edit item]
Theory type: Design and action [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Case [edit item]
Theories: "In this paper, we adopt an ensemble view of wiki technology. According to Orlikowski and Iaconno (2001), this perspective focuses on “the dynamic interactions between people and technology—whether during construction, implementation, or use in organizations, or during the deployment of technology in society” (p. 126). Specifically, we assume that technology, Embod[ies] social structures (conceptualized in terms of Giddens’ notion of structure as sets of rules and resources), which presumably have been built into the technology by designers during its development and which are then appropriated by users as they interact with the technology. Typical questions addressed by this literature include: How do users appropriate the social structures embodied in a given technology and with what outcomes? What are the intended and unintended consequences of using a given technology? (Orlikowski and Iacono 2001, p. 127)" [edit item]
Research design: Content analysis, Experiment [edit item]
Data source: Experiment responses, Experiment responses, Survey responses, Wikipedia pages [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: Longitudinal [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Edit, User [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: Live Wikipedia [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: Article, Article:talk, User, History [edit item]
Wikipedia language: English [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"this paper calls for the IS discipline to engage in two actions related to wikis and other Web 2.0 tools. First, the IS discipline ought to engage in critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently. We advocate and describe a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them."

[edit] Comments

"this paper calls for the IS discipline to engage critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently; also advocate a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them."


Further notes[edit]

Facts about "The shoemaker's children: using wikis for information systems teaching, research, and publication"RDF feed
AbstractThis paper argues that Web 2.0 tools, specThis paper argues that Web 2.0 tools, specifically wikis, have begun to influence business and knowledge sharing practices in many organizations. Information Systems researchers have spent considerable time exploring the impact and implications of these tools in organizations, but those same researchers have not spent sufficient time considering whether and how these new technologies may provide opportunities for us to reform our core practices of research, review, and teaching. To this end, this paper calls for the {IS} discipline to engage in two actions related to wikis and other Web 2.0 tools. First, the {IS} discipline ought to engage in critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently. Our existing practices were formulated during an era of paperbased exchange; wikis and other Web 2.0 tools may enable processes that could be substantively better. Nevertheless, users can appropriate information technology tools in unexpected ways, and even when tools are appropriated as expected there can be unintended negative consequences. Any potential changes to our core processes should, therefore, be considered critically and carefully, leading to our second recommended action. We advocate and describe a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them. We argue that these experiments can provide needed information regarding Web 2.0 tools and related practice changes that could help the discipline better assess whether or not new practices would be superior to existing ones and under which circumstances.isting ones and under which circumstances.
Added by wikilit teamAdded on initial load +
Collected data time dimensionLongitudinal +
Commentsthis paper calls for the IS discipline to this paper calls for the IS discipline to engage critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently; also advocate a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them.anges that would be necessary to use them.
Conclusionthis paper calls for the IS discipline to this paper calls for the IS discipline to engage in two actions related to wikis and other Web 2.0 tools. First, the IS discipline ought to engage in critical reflection about how wikis and other Web 2.0 tools could allow us to conduct our core processes differently. We advocate and describe a series of controlled experiments that will help assess the impact of these technologies on our core processes and the associated changes that would be necessary to use them.anges that would be necessary to use them.
Data sourceExperiment responses +, Survey responses + and Wikipedia pages +
Google scholar urlhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22The%2Bshoemaker%27s%2Bchildren%3A%2Busing%2Bwikis%2Bfor%2Binformation%2Bsystems%2Bteaching%2C%2Bresearch%2C%2Band%2Bpublication%22 +
Has authorGerald C. Kane + and Robert G. Fichman +
Has domainInformation systems +
Has topicResearch platform +
Issue1 +
Peer reviewedYes +
Publication typeJournal article +
Published inMIS Quarterly +
Research designContent analysis + and Experiment +
Research questionsInformation Systems researchers have spentInformation Systems researchers have spent considerable time exploring the impact and implications of these tools in organizations, but those same researchers have not spent sufficient time considering whether and how these new technologies may provide opportunities for us to reform our core practices of research, review, and teaching.actices of research, review, and teaching.
Revid10,993 +
TheoriesIn this paper, we adopt an ensemble view oIn this paper, we adopt an ensemble view of wiki technology. According to Orlikowski and Iaconno (2001), this perspective focuses on “the dynamic interactions between people and technology—whether during construction, implementation, or use in organizations, or during the deployment of technology in society” (p. 126). Specifically, we assume that technology, Embod[ies] social structures (conceptualized in terms of Giddens’ notion of structure as sets of rules and resources), which presumably have been built into the technology by designers during its development and which are then appropriated by users as they interact with the technology. Typical questions addressed by this literature include: How do users appropriate the social structures embodied in a given technology and with what outcomes? What are the intended and unintended consequences of using a given technology? (Orlikowski and Iacono 2001, p. 127)logy? (Orlikowski and Iacono 2001, p. 127)
Theory typeDesign and action +
TitleThe shoemaker's children: using wikis for information systems teaching, research, and publication
Unit of analysisEdit + and User +
Urlhttps://www.socialtext.net/data/workspaces/misq5040/attachments/misq_5040:20090128162705-2-31083/original/kanefichman&comments.pdf +
Volume33 +
Wikipedia coverageCase +
Wikipedia data extractionLive Wikipedia +
Wikipedia languageEnglish +
Wikipedia page typeArticle +, Article:talk +, User + and History +
Year2009 +