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The range of Linus' Law
Abstract After more than a decade of successful groAfter more than a decade of successful growth, Wikipedia continues to defy easy characterization. It receives more than 400 million viewers per month. Close to four million articles grace its web pages in English alone. Volunteers built the entire corpus of text. This experience suggests that Wikipedia has done something right, but begs the question: Which actions mattered, and which ones were merely incidental? Answering that question is the key to finding general lessons for countless other web sites that aggregate user-generated content. Many Wikipedians believe that Linus’ Law is an important ingredient in their sauce. Coined by Eric Raymond, this law is less legal precept than slogan—namely, “Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.” Few people know that it is actually a pert and terse restatement of a quote from Linus Torvalds, who originally said, “Given a large enough beta-tester and co-developer base, almost every problem will be characterized quickly and the fix obvious to someone.” Raymond’s restatement drops all the qualifiers, vesting the proposition with more certitude and making it more egalitarian by extending it to nonexperts. Wikipedia’s experience suggests Raymond was onto something. Let’s consider when the Law works and why it sometimes fails at Wikipedia.s and why it sometimes fails at Wikipedia.
Added by wikilit team No but verified  +
Collected data time dimension N/A  +
Conclusion Linus’ Law depends on some economic conditLinus’ Law depends on some economic conditions and quite a few supplements. Eyeballs may be cheap to assemble, but it works better at Wikipedia when objective information is inexpensive to find, or when additional subjective information is cheap to add. It also works better when the cost of verification is low. It also works best in the presence of civility. Every supplement to Linus’ Law requires editors with the right attitude. Crucially, no side must claim exclusive rights to determine the answer. exclusive rights to determine the answer.
Data source N/A  +
Doi 10.1109/MM.2012.10 +
Google scholar url http://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22The%2BRange%2Bof%2BLinus%27%2BLaw%22  +
Has author Shane Greenstein +
Has domain Economics + , Information systems +
Has topic Encyclopedias + , Wikipedia as a system + , Quality improvement processes +
Issue 1  +
Month February  +
Pages 72  +
Peer reviewed Yes  +
Publication type Journal article  +
Published in IEEE Micro +
Publisher IEEE +
Research design Conceptual  +
Research questions Linus' Law is “Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.” When does the Law work and why does it sometimes fails at Wikipedia?
Revid 10,987  +
Theories Many Wikipedians believe that Linus’ Law is an important ingredient in their sauce. Coined by Eric Raymond, this law is less legal precept than slogan—namely, ‘‘Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.’
Theory type Explanation  +
Title The Range of Linus' Law
Unit of analysis Article  +
Url http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/articleDetails.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6144284&contentType=Journals%2B%26%2BMagazines&pageNumber%3D2%26queryText%3DGreenstein  +
Volume 32  +
Wikipedia coverage Main topic  +
Wikipedia data extraction N/A  +
Wikipedia language English  +
Wikipedia page type N/A  +
Year 2012  +
Creation dateThis property is a special property in this wiki. 30 May 2012 13:41:04  +
Categories Encyclopedias  + , Wikipedia as a system  + , Quality improvement processes  + , Economics  + , Information systems  + , Publications with missing comments  + , Publications  +
Modification dateThis property is a special property in this wiki. 30 January 2014 20:31:52  +
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