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An empirical examination of Wikipedia's credibility
Abstract Wikipedia is a free, online encyclopaedia;Wikipedia is a free, online encyclopaedia; anyone can add content or edit existing content. The idea behind Wikipedia is that members of the public can add their own personal knowledge, anonymously if they wish. Wikipedia then evolves over time into a comprehensive knowledge base on all things. Its popularity has never been questioned, although some have speculated about its authority. By its own admission, Wikipedia contains errors. A number of people have tested Wikipedia's accuracy using destructive methods, that is, deliberately inserting errors. This has been criticized by Wikipedia. This short study examined Wikipedia's credibility by asking 258 research staff, with a response rate of 21%, to read an article and assess its credibility, the credibility of its author, and the credibility of Wikipedia as a whole. Staff were either given an article in their own expert domain or a random article. No difference was found between the two groups in terms of their perceived credibility of Wikipedia or of the articles' authors, but a difference was found in the credibility of the articles — the experts found Wikipedia's articles to be more credible than the nonexperts. This suggests that the accuracy of Wikipedia is high. However, the results should not be seen as support for Wikipedia as a totally reliable resource as, according to the experts, 13% of the articles contain mistakes.rts, 13% of the articles contain mistakes.
Added by wikilit team Added on initial load  +
Collected data time dimension Cross-sectional  +
Comments Both experts and non-experts agreed on theBoth experts and non-experts agreed on the credibility of Wikipedia and of the articles’ authors, but the experts found Wikipedia’s articles to be more credible than the non–experts; This suggests that the accuracy of Wikipedia is high but it doesn't mean that Wikipedia is totally reliable.t mean that Wikipedia is totally reliable.
Conclusion No difference was found between the two grNo difference was found between the two group in terms of their perceived credibility of Wikipedia or of the articles’ authors, but a difference was found in the credibility of the articles — the experts found Wikipedia’s articles to be more credible than the non–experts. This suggests that the accuracy of Wikipedia is high. However, the results should not be seen as support for Wikipedia as a totally reliable resource as, according to the experts, 13 percent of the articles contain mistakes. percent of the articles contain mistakes.
Data source Experiment responses  + , Survey responses  +
Google scholar url http://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22An%2Bempirical%2Bexamination%2Bof%2BWikipedia%27s%2Bcredibility%22  +
Has author Thomas Chesney +
Has domain Information systems +
Has topic Reliability +
Issue 11  +
Peer reviewed Yes  +
Publication type Journal article  +
Published in First Monday +
Research design Experiment  + , Statistical analysis  +
Research questions This short study examines Wikipedia’s credibility by asking 258 research staff with a response rate of 21 percent, to read an article and assess its credibility, the credibility of its author and the credibility of Wikipedia as a whole.
Revid 10,657  +
Theories Undetermined
Theory type Analysis  + , Explanation  +
Title An empirical examination of Wikipedia's credibility
Unit of analysis Article  +
Url http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/1413  +
Volume 11  +
Wikipedia coverage Main topic  +
Wikipedia data extraction Live Wikipedia  +
Wikipedia language Not specified  +
Wikipedia page type Article  +
Year 2006  +
Creation dateThis property is a special property in this wiki. 15 March 2012 20:02:46  +
Categories Reliability  + , Information systems  + , Publications  +
Modification dateThis property is a special property in this wiki. 30 January 2014 20:20:29  +
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