From Friday to Sunday: the hacker ethic and shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property

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From Friday to Sunday: the hacker ethic and shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property
Authors: James J. Brown [edit item]
Citation: Leisure Studies 27 (4): 395-409. 2008.
Publication type: Journal article
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s):
DOI: 10.1080/02614360802334922.
Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Added on initial load
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From Friday to Sunday: the hacker ethic and shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property is a publication by James J. Brown.


[edit] Abstract

Leisure studies scholars have theorised how the Web is changing leisure experiences, and this essay continues that work by discussing the Web and shifting notions of leisure, labour and intellectual property. Much online activity is described under the umbrella term of 'piracy'. By discussing online cultural production in terms of what Pekka Himanen calls the hacker ethic, we can rethink rhetorics of piracy and better understand the positive and negative aspects of online activities. Rather than thinking of online activity as derivative, we can reframe Web texts as doing what all cultural texts do - build upon the past. The ethic of the Web is built on a hacker approach to work, play, collaboration, intellectual property. Facebook applications and Wikipedia entries are just two examples of Web users' embrace of the hacker ethic. But is this labour or leisure? Is Wikipedia, a text edited and maintained by volunteers, the result of work or play? Himanen provides a new way to view online activities that sit in between the categories of labour and leisure. Further, the hacker ethic allows us to understand the contested terms of labour and leisure alongside a third contested term: intellectual property. This paper provides a framework to help us better understand the new immaterial aspects of leisure activity happening on the Web. A discussion of these activities in terms of the hacker ethic allows scholars to explore shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property without resorting to rhetorics of piracy.

[edit] Research questions

"This paper provides a framework to help us better understand the new immaterial aspects of leisure activity happening on the Web. A discussion of these activities in terms of the hacker ethic allows scholars to explore shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property without resorting to rhetorics of piracy."

Research details

Topics: Other antecedents of participation [edit item]
Domains: Other humanities [edit item]
Theory type: Analysis [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Case [edit item]
Theories: "Leisure studies theory" [edit item]
Research design: Conceptual [edit item]
Data source: N/A [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: N/A [edit item]
Unit of analysis: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia language: Not specified [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"In our attempts to determine the exact nature of online activity in terms of labour or leisure, it may be useful to turn to the other contested term that I have discussed in this essay: property. The attitude towards intellectual property displayed online – an attitude that is entirely in line with the hacker ethic – is one that we might study closely as we consider the problems the film and music industries face. If the Web is becoming an increasingly Pro-Am space, then it will become more and more difficult to determine clear distinctions between labour and leisure. Certainly, this is to the advantage of a system of capitalism that continues to extract maximum value from labourers. In this regard, the dissolving boundary between labour and leisure might be yet another trait of what many call ‘late capitalism’. However, if labour is being ‘leisurised’ and leisure is being ‘labourised’, we might turn to shifting notions of property as that which is pushing against late capitalism’s desire to subsume everything under the umbrella of ‘property"

[edit] Comments


Further notes[edit]

Facts about "From Friday to Sunday: the hacker ethic and shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property"RDF feed
AbstractLeisure studies scholars have theorised hoLeisure studies scholars have theorised how the Web is changing leisure experiences, and this essay continues that work by discussing the Web and shifting notions of leisure, labour and intellectual property. Much online activity is described under the umbrella term of 'piracy'. By discussing online cultural production in terms of what Pekka Himanen calls the hacker ethic, we can rethink rhetorics of piracy and better understand the positive and negative aspects of online activities. Rather than thinking of online activity as derivative, we can reframe Web texts as doing what all cultural texts do - build upon the past. The ethic of the Web is built on a hacker approach to work, play, collaboration, intellectual property. Facebook applications and Wikipedia entries are just two examples of Web users' embrace of the hacker ethic. But is this labour or leisure? Is Wikipedia, a text edited and maintained by volunteers, the result of work or play? Himanen provides a new way to view online activities that sit in between the categories of labour and leisure. Further, the hacker ethic allows us to understand the contested terms of labour and leisure alongside a third contested term: intellectual property. This paper provides a framework to help us better understand the new immaterial aspects of leisure activity happening on the Web. A discussion of these activities in terms of the hacker ethic allows scholars to explore shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property without resorting to rhetorics of piracy. without resorting to rhetorics of piracy.
Added by wikilit teamAdded on initial load +
Collected data time dimensionN/A +
ConclusionIn our attempts to determine the exact natIn our attempts to determine the exact nature of online activity in terms of labour or

leisure, it may be useful to turn to the other contested term that I have discussed in this essay: property. The attitude towards intellectual property displayed online – an attitude that is entirely in line with the hacker ethic – is one that we might study closely as we consider the problems the film and music industries face. If the Web is becoming an increasingly Pro-Am space, then it will become more and more difficult to determine clear distinctions between labour and leisure. Certainly, this is to the advantage of a system of capitalism that continues to extract maximum value from labourers. In this regard, the dissolving boundary between labour and leisure might be yet another trait of what many call ‘late capitalism’. However, if labour is being ‘leisurised’ and leisure is being ‘labourised’, we might turn to shifting notions of property as that which is pushing against late capitalism’s desire to

subsume everything under the umbrella of ‘property
everything under the umbrella of ‘property
Data sourceN/A +
Doi10.1080/02614360802334922 +
Google scholar urlhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22From%2BFriday%2Bto%2BSunday%3A%2Bthe%2Bhacker%2Bethic%2Band%2Bshifting%2Bnotions%2Bof%2Blabour%2C%2Bleisure%2Band%2Bintellectual%2Bproperty%22 +
Has authorJames J. Brown +
Has domainOther humanities +
Has topicOther antecedents of participation +
Issue4 +
Pages395-409 +
Peer reviewedYes +
Publication typeJournal article +
Published inLeisure Studies +
Research designConceptual +
Research questionsThis paper provides a framework to help usThis paper provides a framework to help us better understand the new immaterial aspects of

leisure activity happening on the Web. A discussion of these activities in terms of the hacker ethic allows scholars to explore shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual

property without resorting to rhetorics of piracy.
without resorting to rhetorics of piracy.
Revid11,257 +
TheoriesLeisure studies theory
Theory typeAnalysis +
TitleFrom Friday to Sunday: the hacker ethic and shifting notions of labour, leisure and intellectual property
Unit of analysisN/A +
Urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02614360802334922 +
Volume27 +
Wikipedia coverageCase +
Wikipedia data extractionN/A +
Wikipedia languageNot specified +
Wikipedia page typeN/A +
Year2008 +