Creative commons international the international license porting project

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Creative commons international the international license porting project
Authors: Catharina Maracke [edit item]
Citation: JIPITEC 1 (1): . 2010 March.
Publication type: Journal article
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s):
DOI: Define doi.
Google Scholar cites: Not available
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Added on initial load
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Creative commons international the international license porting project is a publication by Catharina Maracke.


[edit] Abstract

When Creative Commons (CC) was founded in 2001, the core Creative Commons licenses were drafted according to United States Copyright Law. Since their first introduction in December 2002, Creative Commons licenses have been enthusiastically adopted by many creators, authors, and other content producers – not only in the United States, but in many other jurisdictions as well. Global interest in the CC licenses prompted a discussion about the need for national versions of the CC licenses. To best address this need, the international license porting project ("Creative Commons International" – formerly known as "International Commons") was launched in 2003. Creative Commons International works to port the core Creative Commons licenses to different copyright legislations around the world. The porting process includes both linguistically translating the licenses and legally adapting the licenses to a particular jurisdiction such that they are comprehensible in the local jurisdiction and legally enforceable but concurrently retain the same key elements. Since its inception, Creative Commons International has found many supporters all over the world. With Finland, Brazil, and Japan as the first completed jurisdiction projects, experts around the globe have followed their lead and joined the international collaboration with Creative Commons to adapt the licenses to their local copyright. This article aims to present an overview of the international porting process, explain and clarify the international license architecture, its legal and promotional aspects, as well as its most recent challenges.

[edit] Research questions

"This article aims to present an overview of the international porting process, explain and clarify the international license architecture, its legal and promotional aspects, as well as its most recent challenges."

Research details

Topics: Legal infrastructure [edit item]
Domains: Communications, Law [edit item]
Theory type: Analysis [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Case [edit item]
Theories: "The concept of the author’s moral rights goes back to

the early days of copyright in the Continental European regimes.20 The theory behind moral rights according to European Continental law is that authors of copyrightable works have inalienable rights21 in their works that protect their moral or personal interest and that complement the author’s economic rights." [edit item]

Research design: Conceptual [edit item]
Data source: N/A [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: N/A [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Website [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia language: Not specified [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"Creative Commons’ licenses and other tools provide an additional option for copyright creators and right holders to structure their rights in a more flexible way. In this way, the “best-of both-worlds” is offered: a way to protect creative works while encouraging certain uses of them, tailored to each creators individual preference. Creative Commons’ global porting project ensures that this new way of balancing copyright can be exercised on an international level and at the same time helps to increase the global commons of easily accessible content. Concurrently, a network of international legal and technical experts has been built to collaborate on the internationalization of the core Creative Commons licensing suite, license maintenance and legal commentary on new license versions.

Although with the support of the international network the Creative Commons licensing suite has been successfully ported to more than 50 jurisdictions, there are still some interesting legal questions to be discussed and researched. In particular, questions of Private International Law and how Creative Commons licensing can best interact with and become compatible with other open content licensing models are two topics that need to be addressed in order to complete the international project and achieve an internationally functioning structure. There is no doubt that there are still many problems to be solved, but there is also no doubt that many of these issues can be resolved by the international network and the global Creative Commons community itself."

[edit] Comments

"Operation: Licensing: Creative Commons"


Further notes[edit]

Facts about "Creative commons international the international license porting project"RDF feed
AbstractWhen Creative Commons (CC) was founded in When Creative Commons (CC) was founded in 2001, the core Creative Commons licenses were drafted according to United States Copyright Law. Since their first introduction in December 2002, Creative Commons licenses have been enthusiastically adopted by many creators, authors, and other content producers – not only in the United States, but in many other jurisdictions as well. Global interest in the CC licenses prompted a discussion about the need for national versions of the CC licenses. To best address this need, the international license porting project ("Creative Commons International" – formerly known as "International Commons") was launched in 2003. Creative Commons International works to port the core Creative Commons licenses to different copyright legislations around the world. The porting process includes both linguistically translating the licenses and legally adapting the licenses to a particular jurisdiction such that they are comprehensible in the local jurisdiction and legally enforceable but concurrently retain the same key elements. Since its inception, Creative Commons International has found many supporters all over the world. With Finland, Brazil, and Japan as the first completed jurisdiction projects, experts around the globe have followed their lead and joined the international collaboration with Creative Commons to adapt the licenses to their local copyright. This article aims to present an overview of the international porting process, explain and clarify the international license architecture, its legal and promotional aspects, as well as its most recent challenges.ts, as well as its most recent challenges.
Added by wikilit teamAdded on initial load +
Collected data time dimensionN/A +
CommentsOperation: Licensing: Creative Commons
ConclusionCreative Commons’ licenses and other toolsCreative Commons’ licenses and other tools provide an additional option for copyright

creators and right holders to structure their rights in a more flexible way. In this way, the “best-of both-worlds” is offered: a way to protect creative works while encouraging certain uses of them, tailored to each creators individual preference. Creative Commons’ global porting project ensures that this new way of balancing copyright can be exercised on an international level and at the same time helps to increase the global commons of easily accessible content. Concurrently, a network of international legal and technical experts has been built to collaborate on the internationalization of the core Creative Commons licensing suite, license maintenance and legal commentary on new license versions.

Although with the support of the international network the Creative Commons licensing suite has been successfully ported to more than 50 jurisdictions, there are still some interesting legal questions to be discussed and researched. In particular, questions of Private International Law and how Creative Commons licensing can best interact with and become compatible with other open content licensing models are two topics that need to be addressed in order to complete the international project and achieve an internationally functioning structure. There is no doubt that there are still many problems to be solved, but there is also no doubt that many of these issues can be resolved

by the international network and the global Creative Commons community itself.
global Creative Commons community itself.
Data sourceN/A +
Google scholar urlhttp://scholar.google.com/scholar?ie=UTF-8&q=%22Creative%2Bcommons%2Binternational%2Bthe%2Binternational%2Blicense%2Bporting%2Bproject%22 +
Has authorCatharina Maracke +
Has domainCommunications + and Law +
Has topicLegal infrastructure +
Issue1 +
MonthMarch +
Peer reviewedYes +
Publication typeJournal article +
Published inJIPITEC +
Research designConceptual +
Research questionsThis article aims to present an overview of the international porting

process, explain and clarify the international license architecture, its legal and promotional aspects, as

well as its most recent challenges.
Revid10,718 +
TheoriesThe concept of the author’s moral rights gThe concept of the author’s moral rights goes back to

the early days of copyright in the Continental European regimes.20 The theory behind moral rights according to European Continental law is that authors of copyrightable works have inalienable rights21 in their works that protect their moral or personal interest and that complement the author’s economic rights.t complement the author’s economic

rights.
Theory typeAnalysis +
TitleCreative commons international the international license porting project
Unit of analysisWebsite +
Urlhttp://www.jipitec.eu/issues/jipitec-1-1-2010/2417 +
Volume1 +
Wikipedia coverageCase +
Wikipedia data extractionN/A +
Wikipedia languageNot specified +
Wikipedia page typeN/A +
Year2010 +