Last modified on January 30, 2014, at 20:28

Governance in social media: a case study of the Wikipedia promotion process

Publication (help)
Governance in social media: a case study of the Wikipedia promotion process
Authors: Jure Leskovec, Daniel Huttenlocher, Jon Kleinberg [edit item]
Citation: Fourth International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media  : 98-105. 2010 April 20.
Publication type: Conference paper
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s): arXiv (arXiv/1004.3547) CiteULike
DOI: Define doi.
Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Yes
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Governance in social media: a case study of the Wikipedia promotion process is a publication by Jure Leskovec, Daniel Huttenlocher, Jon Kleinberg.


[edit] Abstract

Social media sites are often guided by a core group of committed users engaged in various forms of governance. A crucial aspect of this type of governance is deliberation, inwhich such a group reaches decisions on issues of importance to the site. Despite its crucial — though subtle — role in how a number of prominent social media sites function, there has been relatively little investigation of the deliberative aspects of social media governance. Here we explore this issue, investigating a particular deliberative process that is extensive, public, and recorded: the promotion of Wikipedia admins, which is determined by elections that engage committed members of the Wikipedia community. We find that the group decision-making at the heart of this process exhibits several fundamental forms of relative assessment. First we observe that the chance that a voter will support a candidate is strongly dependent on the relationship between characteristics of the voter and the candidate. Second we investigate how both individual voter decisions and overall election outcomes can be based on models that take into account the sequential, public nature of the voting.

[edit] Research questions

"What determines the chances that a voter would vote for a user's promotion to admin status? What are the voting patterns seen?"

Research details

Topics: Deliberative collaboration, Policies and governance, Social order [edit item]
Domains: Computer science [edit item]
Theory type: Analysis [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Main topic [edit item]
Theories: ""theories of sequential expressions of opinion in on-line settings

(Wu and Huberman 2008); these theories argue that such deviations represent a tendency for users to be more motivated to express an opinion when it goes against the prevailing outcome"; "theories of herding and information cascades"" [edit item]

Research design: Econometrics and time series, Statistical analysis [edit item]
Data source: Wikipedia pages [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: Longitudinal [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Edit, User [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: Dump [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: Article:talk, User, User:talk, History, Policy, Policy:talk, Collaboration and coordination [edit item]
Wikipedia language: English [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"We find that the group decision-making at the heart of this process exhibits several fundamental forms of relative assessment. First we observe that the chance that a voter will support a candidate is strongly dependent on the relationship between characteristics of the voter and the candidate. Second we investigate how both individual voter decisions and overall election outcomes can be based on models that take into account the sequential, public nature of the voting."

[edit] Comments


Further notes[edit]