Difference between revisions of "Expediency-based practice? Medical students' reliance on Google and Wikipedia for biomedical inquiries"

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|authors=Terry Judd, Gregor Kennedy
 
|authors=Terry Judd, Gregor Kennedy
 
|published_in=British Journal of Educational Technology
 
|published_in=British Journal of Educational Technology
|year=2009
+
|year=2011
 +
|month=March
 +
|volume=42
 +
|issue=2
 +
|pages=351-360
 +
|publisher=Wiley
 
|url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.01019.x
 
|url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.01019.x
 
|peer_reviewed=Yes
 
|peer_reviewed=Yes

Latest revision as of 18:05, February 21, 2014

Publication (help)
Expediency-based practice? Medical students' reliance on Google and Wikipedia for biomedical inquiries
Authors: Terry Judd, Gregor Kennedy [edit item]
Citation: British Journal of Educational Technology 42 (2): 351-360. 2011 March. Wiley.
Publication type: Journal article
Peer-reviewed: Yes
Database(s):
DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.01019.x.
Google Scholar cites: Citations
Link(s): Paper link
Added by Wikilit team: Added on initial load
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Expediency-based practice? Medical students' reliance on Google and Wikipedia for biomedical inquiries is a publication by Terry Judd, Gregor Kennedy.


[edit] Abstract

Internet usage logs captured during self-directed learning sessions were used to determine how undergraduate medical students used five popular sites to locate and access biomedical resources. Students' perceptions of each site's usefulness and reliability were determined through a survey. Google and Wikipedia were the most frequently used sites despite students rating them as the least reliable of the five sites investigated. The library--the students' primary point of access to online journals--was the least used site, and when using Google less than 40% of pages or resources located by students were from 'high' quality sources. Students' use of all sites' search tools was unsophisticated. Despite being avid users of online information and search tools, the students targeted in this study appeared to lack the requisite information-seeking skills to make the most of online resources. Although there is evidence that these skills improved over time, a greater emphasis on information literacy skills training may be required to ensure that graduates are able to locate the best available evidence to support their professional practice.

[edit] Research questions

"Given the increasing importance of online resources to medical students, educators and practitioners, and questions about students' actual versus perceived skills with these technologies, a closer examination of the way in which students use online resources is warranted. This paper reports on a cross-cohort investigation of students' use of a series of key online resources, including both generalist and specialist searching and information tools to support their self-directed study within a problem-based medical curriculum. The key questions being examined in this investigation were (1) to what extent do students rely on key online resources in their self-directed study and how does their use vary, if at all, by students' year level; (2) how sophisticated are students' uses of these online resources; (3) how useful and reliable do students perceive these resources to be; and (4) what is the reliability of the resources students access via the Internet."

Research details

Topics: Domain-specific student readership, Student information literacy [edit item]
Domains: Health, Education [edit item]
Theory type: Analysis [edit item]
Wikipedia coverage: Case [edit item]
Theories: "Undetermined" [edit item]
Research design: Statistical analysis [edit item]
Data source: Computer usage logs, Survey responses [edit item]
Collected data time dimension: Cross-sectional [edit item]
Unit of analysis: Website [edit item]
Wikipedia data extraction: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia page type: N/A [edit item]
Wikipedia language: Not specified [edit item]

[edit] Conclusion

"Given the increasing importance of online resources to medical students, educators and practitioners, and questions about students' actual versus perceived skills with these technologies, a closer examination of the way in which students use online resources is warranted. This paper reports on a cross-cohort investigation of students' use of a series of key online resources, including both generalist and specialist searching and information tools to support their self-directed study within a problem-based medical curriculum. The key questions being examined in this investigation were (1) to what extent do students rely on key online resources in their self-directed study and how does their use vary, if at all, by students' year level; (2) how sophisticated are students' uses of these online resources; (3) how useful and reliable do students perceive these resources to be; and (4) what is the reliability of the resources students access via the Internet."

[edit] Comments

"a greater emphasis on information literacy skills training may be required to ensure that graduates are able to locate the best available evidence to support their professional practice."


Further notes[edit]